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Uncivil Unrest

January 23, 2017 6 comments

II. Of the CIVIL MAGISTRATES supreme and subordinate.

A Mason is a peaceable Subject to the Civil Powers, wherever he resides or works, and is never to be concern’d in Plots and Conspiracies against the Peace and Welfare of the Nation, nor to behave himself undutifully to inferior Magistrates; for as Masonry hath been always injured by War, Bloodshed, and Confusion, so ancient Kings and Princes have been much dispos’d to encourage the Craftsmen, because of their Peaceableness and Loyalty, whereby they practically answer’d the Cavils of their Adversaries, and promoted the Honour of the Fraternity, who ever flourish’d in Times of Peace. So that if a Brother should be a Rebel against the State he is not to be countenanc’d in his Rebellion, however he may be pitied as an unhappy Man; and, if convicted of no other Crime though the loyal Brotherhood must and ought to disown his Rebellion, and give no Umbrage or Ground of political Jealousy to the Government for the time being; they cannot expel him from the Lodge, and his Relation to it remains indefeasible.


Freemasons in the US, at least, those not living in caves, can’t help but be aware that the recent US Presidential elections (and the equally important, although lesser discussed senatorial and representative elections) has been the most hotly contested race – and the most surprising upset –  probably since Ronald Reagan.

For reasons which I’m not inclined to discuss here, the election upset was so unexpected that the concern and complaints about it have gone on long after election day, and even after our new President was installed… err, inaugurated. Indeed, Facebook and Twitter seem to be talking about little else lately; even posts about bacon seem to be less frequent.

There is a time-honored tradition of not discussing religion or politics inside a Masonic lodge. Ostensibly to help maintain the harmony of the membership, some Freemasons mistakenly interpret this as neither subject is to be discussed at all, or as that neither subject should be discussed in any Masonic forum (either an online forum or a group at the local pub). Historically, however, it is probably the case that early lodges, not wishing to be seen as a society that might harbor traitors to the Crown or the Church, banned such discussions to avoid the appearance of impropriety. The tradition was strong enough in the early 1700s, however, to motivate Anderson to include it in his Constitutions.

I’m not surprised to see Freemasons on both sides of the election disagreement (4 sides of you include the Libertarian and Green party candidates), and frankly, given the nature of the contest, I’m not surprised to see many of them speaking out so vocally online. I am, however, a little disappointed to see some of them attacking each other, instead of limiting their arguments to attacking the candidates or their positions, characteristics, and perceived shortcomings.

While I’m all for keeping religious and political discussion out of the lodge meetings themselves (although it might liven up a few lodges after listening to the drone of the minutes), I’d argue that to keep Masons from talking about those topics with each other would be unnatural. Can you imagine the discussions that must have taken place around taverns and dinner tables in mid-1700s America? It’s conceivable that the American Revolution might not have taken place if the men – the Freemasons – of that time had interpreted the tradition the same way that so many of us do now.

Yet, despite my assertion that political discussion after the meeting (or online) is part of human nature, I’m still disappointed in how I see many of my fellow Masons going about it. Recent brain scan MRI studies have shown that political and religious thinking show up in the same areas as self-identification, meaning that our political philosophies are an intrinsic part of who we are as a person. Attacking and insulting each other is certainly not going to change anyone’s mind; if anything, human nature will just make that person dig in and more self-protective.

To be sure, some people can keep it light. Others have learned how to discuss seriously, but without rancor. It’s possible, really. But if your own argument is reduced to calling someone — whether a friend or a complete stranger — an insulting name, then maybe it’s time that you re-examine your own beliefs.  Or better yet, turn off your phone or computer and go get some fresh air.

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New England Brotherhood Night

February 13, 2014 4 comments

Masons love to refer to themselves as “Traveling men,” and indeed, that’s one of the first things that we tend to tell new Entered Apprentice Masons. “Study hard, and get your Master Mason certificate so you can travel to other lodges.”

Well, here’s an opportunity for other lodges to travel to you:

New England Brotherhood Night

From the Grand Lodge of Connecticut website:

New England Brotherhood Night is an opportunity for masonic brothers from throughout New England to meet, make new friends, see old friends, exchange stories, share ideas, and sometimes even arrange an inter-jurisdictional visit or two! The evening is open to all Master Masons, and starts with a cocktail hour, followed by dinner, and finally wrapping up with a program.

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014
Cocktail Hour 5pm – Southern Barbecue Dinner 6pm – Program 7pm
Woodstock Academy – 57 Academy Rd, Woodstock, CT 06281

This event rotates throughout the six New England states, so each state only has the opportunity to host this event once every six years. “Next year’s” host state provides the program for “this year”. Past programs have included Hollywood writers, the men who planned and commanded the Osama Bin Laden raid, and the captain of the Coast Guard cutter who sailed out into the “Perfect Storm” attempting to rescue the Andrea Gail.

Proper attire is a jacket and tie. This is not an open meeting, so aprons and jewels are unnecessary. Reservations and payment must be made through the Grand Secretary’s office.  RSVP Deadline:  March 14th

I’ve been to these nights, and it’s a great way to meet Masons from around New England. Hell, it’s a great way to meet Masons from around your state that you might not normally run into.

Woodstock is in the Rhode Island corner of Connecticut, and is home to Putnam Lodge No. 46, which is noted for the members who pushed for the Connecticut & Rhode Island Grand Lodge merger a few years ago.

Click Here For New England Brotherhood Flyer (PDF)

Hope to see you there!

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